Ukraine news LIVE: China’s Xi ‘will wage war’ and ‘is ready to act’ if Russia’s evil Putin bags Ukraine ‘victory’

TENSIONS in South China are said to be mounting as China’s President waits to see how war in Ukraine plays out before acting on Taiwan.

A US military expert has said China is watching Russia extremely closely, and if Putin can pull of a “victory” in Ukraine, China will not hesitate to take action.

China could be mobilised to seize Taiwan, after it had held military drills near the country, when US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made a visit to the nation.

Dr John Callahan, believes the cards for Taiwan are being dealt directly by the military action in Ukraine as China’s President Xi Jinping watches and waits.

The former State Department spokesperson told the Express: “If Russia pulls off some sort of convincing victory in Ukraine – which they won’t -that would certainly embolden China to act, and they would act.”

Speaking on China’s President, he said Jinping is not a “patient” President, and like Putin, “wants to make his mark on history.”

Read our Ukraine-Russia blog below for the latest updates…

  • Latest update on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

    The Ministry of Defence has given Brits a look into some of the new developments in Ukraine.

    The statement reads: “In early March, Russian ground forces assaulted and seized Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP).

    “On 21 August 2022, imagery indicated that Russia maintained an enhanced military presence at the site, with armoured personnel carriers deployed within 60 metres of reactor number five.

    “Russian troops were probably attempting to conceal the vehicles by parking them under overhead pipes and gantries.

    “Russia is probably prepared to exploit any Ukrainian military activity near ZNPP for propaganda purposes.

    “While Russia maintains the military occupation of ZNPP, the principal risks to reactor operations are likely to remain disruption to the reactors’ cooling systems, damage to its back-up power supply, or errors by workers operating under pressure.”

  • Human Rights Watch condemns Russia’s ‘widespread use’ of cluster munitions

    The Human Rights Watch has spoken out against Putin’s use of cluster munitions during his brutal invasion of Ukraine.

    According to this new report, at least 689 civilian casualties from cluster munition attacks were recorded between February and July.

    “The immediate and long-term suffering that cluster munitions cause civilians make their use today in Ukraine unconscionable as well as invariably unlawful,” said Mary Wareham, arms advocacy director at Human Rights Watch.

    “All countries should condemn the use of these weapons under any circumstances.”

    Cluster munitions can be shot from the ground, and typically explode in the air, causing bomblets to affect a wide area.

  • Latvia removes Soviet-era monument

    Latvia has begun work on dismantling a Soviet-era pro-Russia monument that commemorates the defeat of Hitler by the Red Army.

    Speaking on the decision, Riga’s executive director, Janis Lange said: “For Latvians, this monument symbolises Latvia’s occupation after the Second World War and after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, we can’t tolerate it anymore.”

    However, this choice has caused some anger among the country’s ethnically Russian minority.

    Dmitry Prokopenko, a supporter of the monument said:  “Riga is half Latvian, half Russian, and I think that one part of the state, one part of the country should also respect the rights of the other part.”

  • BREAKING: Fires pictured near Europe’s largest nuclear power station

    Fires have been pictured near Europe’s largest nuclear power plant.

    The Russian-held Zaporizhzhia power station has been disconnected from the Ukrainian grid for the first time in its history as a result of these fires.

    Reports suggest that the fires broke out in the ash pits of a coal power station nearby, thus interfering with the nuclear plant’s power.

    “As a result, the station’s two working power units were disconnected from the network,” Energoatom said in a statement.

    “Thus, the actions of the invaders caused a complete disconnection of the (nuclear power plant) from the power grid – the first in the history of the plant,” it said.

  • Vocal critic of Putin taken to court

    This week has seen Yevgeny Roizman, a vocal critic of Putin’s war in Ukraine, arrested.

    Today, the once mayor of Yekaterinburg was pictured being taken to court.

    The EU has condemned his arrest as a “grim act of oppression.”

  • Terrifying images show Russian troops massing at Europe’s biggest nuclear power plant

    Fears of a Chornobyl-style meltdown are continuing to grow as chilling images emerge of Russian troops gathering at the Zaporizhzhia power plant.

    The pictures, shared by the UK’s Ministry of Defence, show Russian armoured personnel carriers and military cargo trucks just 60 metres from reactor five of the six-reactor nuke plant in Zaporizhzhia, southern Ukraine.

    Reports have emerged of Ukrainian workers allegedly being tortured at the plant.

    Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are set to be granted access to the plant in the coming days.

    Russian state media TASS reports that “employees of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant were arrested for informing the Ukrainian Army of the location of Russian military equipment at the plant”.

  • Russian-occupied nuclear plant disconnected from power grid

    The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, which is subject to Russian occupation, has been disconnected from Ukraine’s power grid, officials have claimed.

    “The actions of the invaders caused a complete disconnection of the [Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant] from the power grid – the first in the history of the plant,” said Energoatom, the state energy operator, on Telegram.

    This comes as IAEA officials declare they are “very, very close” to agreeing to a deal with Russia to visit the station.

  • Britain to help Ukraine rebuild transport systems, Grant Shapps announces

    In a historic partnership, the British government will play a central role in rebuilding Ukraine’s transport infrastructure.

    According to the announcement: “Experts will offer knowledge in airport, runway and port reconstruction, and will work with the Ministry of Infrastructure to identify training opportunities for airport staff, air traffic controllers and aviation security.”

    British aid for Ukraine currently sits at approximately £4bn.

  • Putin signs decree to increase the size of Russia’s army

    As the dictator scrambles to improve his fortunes in Ukraine, plans have been set in motion to increase the size of Russia’s armed forces.

    According to the RIA Novosti news agency, Putin’s army will grow from 1.9milliom troops to 2.04million.

    Current estimates from the Ukrainian military have put Russian losses at around 45,000.

  • President Zelensky vows revenge for Russia’s recent attacks

    Ukraine’s Independence Day saw Russia carry out a series of brutal attacks, including one devastating bombing in Chaplyne.

    Now, Zelensky has vowed to get revenge for the bloodthirsty strike.

    Speaking in his nightly address, the Ukrainian leader said: “Chaplyne is our pain today. As of this moment, there are 22 dead, five of them burned in the car, an 11-year-old boy died, a Russian missile destroyed his house.

    “We will definitely make the occupiers bear responsibility for everything they have done. And we will certainly drive the invaders out of our land.”

  • Moscow is committed to Ukraine grain deal, Russian Foreign Ministry claims

    Russia’s Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday that Russia is committed to a Turkish-brokered deal to unblock grain exports from Ukraine struck in Istanbul last month.

    Writing on Telegram, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said that Russia is “entirely committed” to the deal.

  • The state of Russia’s invasion, August 25

    The Ministry of Defence has provided a look at the current situation in Ukraine.

    This comes after a Russian attack on Ukraine’s Dnipropetrovsk region left 25 people dead, including 2 children.

    Putin’s brutal invasion of Ukraine is now six months in, with his forces continuing to dwindle.

  • Her Majesty pays tribute to Ukrainian Independence Day

    Her Majesty the Queen paid tribute to Ukraine yesterday, as the country celebrated its Independence Day.

    In her address to President Volodymyr Zelensky, the monarch said: “It gives me great pleasure to send Your Excellency and the people of Ukraine my warmest greetings on the celebration of your Independence Day.

    “In this most challenging year, I hope that today will be a time for the Ukrainian people, both in Ukraine and around the world, to celebrate their culture, history and identity.

    “May we look to better times in the future”.

  • IAEA officials ‘very, very close’ to plan for nuclear power plant

    Speaking to French media, Rafael Grossi, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, claimed he may soon visit the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant.

    “We are very, very close to that [an agreement with Russia],” Grossi told France 24.

    Since Russia took control of the nuclear facility, fears have been growing over the potential for a Chornobyl-style disaster in the region.

  • UN to provide aid for 70,000 Ukrainians

    The United Nations has announced plans to help a further 70,000 Ukrainians.

    Since Russia’s brutal invasion began, the UN has provided approximately $60 to 140,000 Ukrainians.

    Those seeking aid should apply via the Ukrainian government website.

  • Dad who left his wife for Ukrainian refugee vows to save 100s in war-torn country

    A British father who left his wife for a Ukrainian refugee is now heading to the country, in an attempt to aid its struggling population.

    Tony Garnett, 29, reckons he and girlfriend Sofiia Karkadym can end the bloody conflict themselves and “save hundreds of lives”.

    The dad-of-two told Yorkshire Live: “The longer [the war] goes on for then there’s going to be more deaths – and some could be stopped with this help.

    “I could save hundreds of lives.

    “Even if I save the life of one person then that is worth it for me.”

    It is currently unknown how exactly Garnett plans to take on Putin’s forces.

    He added: “It’s the right thing to do. People are donating to Ukraine but they are not seeing where this money is going to.

    “I want to raise money for people who look after orphans and all those that have been wounded. I want to travel over there myself and document who I am helping. Sofiia will be going with me.

    “I have seen the full scale of things since meeting Sofiia and I think people need this help. It is not a game. I need to use my influence now to do the right thing.”

  • Ben Wallace REJECTS blanket ban on visas for Russians

    The Defence Secretary yesterday rejected the idea of a blanket ban on visas for Russians but insisted “we can toughen up the conditions”.

    Ben Wallace told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “I certainly think we can toughen up the conditions of our visas. I am not sure whether an outright ban is the right way.

    “I think that’s a matter for the Home Secretary to look at. But I don’t like, and I’m sure none of your listeners like watching oligarchs’ wives or indeed Russian senior officials’ wives enjoying themselves in Greece or south of France, or super yachts around the world while their army is committing war crimes in Ukraine.

    “I think that is very wrong. I think the problem has been all the way back to 2014, that Russia invaded Crimea, illegally annexed it, and then it was allowed in some countries to carry on as if nothing had really changed.”

  • Russia carries out a series of Independence Day attacks

    Ukraine celebrated its Independence Dy on Wednesday, while Putin’s forces carried out a brutal bombing campaign.

    President Volodymyr Zelensky has accused Russia of using the day to attack Ukrainian people, including the bombing of a train station, which killed 2 children.

    According to CNN, senior Ukrainian officials reported “missile strikes across Ukrainian territory,” during the nation’s Independence Day.

  • Death toll rises to 25 following Russian attack on a Ukrainian train station

    Reports have emerged that at least 25 people have died, including children, following a Russian attack on Ukraine’s Dnipropetrovsk region.

    Kyrylo Tymoshenko, deputy head of the President’s office said: “Twenty-five people died, including two children, 31 people were injured due to the shelling of the residential sector and the railway station.

    “An 11-year-old boy died under the rubble of a house; a 6-year-old child died in a car fire near the railway station.”

  • Ministry of Defence provides latest update on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

    The Ministry of Defence has given Brits a look into some of the new developments in Ukraine.

    The statement reads: “In early March, Russian ground forces assaulted and seized Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP).

    “On 21 August 2022, imagery indicated that Russia maintained an enhanced military presence at the site, with armoured personnel carriers deployed within 60 metres of reactor number five.

    “Russian troops were probably attempting to conceal the vehicles by parking them under overhead pipes and gantries.

    “Russia is probably prepared to exploit any Ukrainian military activity near ZNPP for propaganda purposes.

    “While Russia maintains the military occupation of ZNPP, the principal risks to reactor operations are likely to remain disruption to the reactors’ cooling systems, damage to its back-up power supply, or errors by workers operating under pressure.”

  • Russian losses surpass 45,000 as Putin’s brutal invasion continues

    According to Ukrainian military estimates, Russian losses are approaching 46,000 as of August 25.

    On top of this, the invading forces have lost 234 planes and 1,929 tanks.

    This comes while people across Ukraine celebrate independence day this week, as they continue to fight against Putin’s bloodthirsty invasion.

  • Boris Johnson blames Russia for Brit’s high energy bills

    The PM, who is set to be replaced this September, spoke during his surprise visit to Kyiv yesterday.

    He said Putin and Russia’s war on Ukraine is to blame for Europe’s energy crisis, and that it is the cause of rising bills.

    “What happens in Ukraine matters to us all, which is why I am here today to deliver the message that the United Kingdom is with you and will be with you for the days and months ahead, and you can and will win,” Boris Johnson said earlier today.

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